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Fresh hope to end Arthritis pain

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Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have discovered a pair of protein molecules that play a crucial and previously unknown role in the progression of Arthritis. The research shows that this protein is important in the development of rheumatoid arthritis and as such could be a potential target in the development of new therapies.

The research, led by Dr Shiva Shahrara and published in the journal ‘Annals Of The Rheumatic Diseases’, found that the molecules, that fit together as a “lock and key,” seem to promote the abnormal formation of blood vessels in joints affected by rheumatoid arthritis.

This blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) is now recognized as a key event in the development of the disease.
Shahrara and her colleagues knew that a protein called CCL28 was found in the body under low oxygen conditions, or hypoxia. Joints affected by rheumatoid arthritis can become hypoxic, so the researchers wanted to see if the protein and its receptor could be found in patients’ affected joints. They measured the levels of the proteins in the tissues and fluid of joints from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and with osteoarthritis, the more common joint inflammation caused by physical wear and tear. Patients of both types had protein levels in their joints that were significantly higher than individuals without joint disease.

The investigators found that CCL28, which is over-produced in joints affected by rheumatoid arthritis, attracts the surface-lining cells that carry its receptor.

When the researchers added CCL28 to cells carrying the receptor, the cells organized into blood vessels. But if they chemically blocked the receptor and added CCL28, formation of blood vessels was reduced.
It is thought that disrupting this would not only prevent delivery of nutrients to inflamed and swollen tissue, but could also possibly lead to a reversal of the disease – and could lead to a new promising therapy for patients.

“We have definitely come a long way and I believe novel therapies will be available for rheumatoid arthritis patients that do not respond to current treatments.” Says Dr. Shahrara.
Natalie Carter, head of research liaison and evaluation at Arthritis Research UK feels that even though this is early laboratory research, it builds on the existing knowledge of the condition and how rheumatoid arthritis develops. She feels this information can be built upon in the near future to develop treatments, enabling people with rheumatoid and other forms of arthritis to remain active and continue to do the activities they love.”

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This web site is run by an Arthritis Specialist based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. On this site you will find news about the latest in arthritis, information about research results in the field, tips and information and diet and exercise, and much more.

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This web site is run by an Arthritis Specialist based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. On this site you will find news about the latest in arthritis, information about research results in the field, tips and information and diet and exercise, and much more.

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